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ORD/FERST_test (MapServer)

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Service Description: This web service displays all air-related layers used in the USEPA Community-Focused Exposure and Risk Screening Tool (C-FERST) and the Tribal-Focused Environmental Risk and Sustainability Tool (Tribal-FERST) mapping applications. (https://www.epa.gov/c-ferst and https://www.epa.gov/tribal-ferst). The following data sources (and layers) are contained in this service: USEPA's 2011 National-Scale Air Toxic Assessment (NATA) data. Data are shown at the census tract level (2010 census tract boundaries, US Census Bureau) for Cumulative Cancer and Non-Cancer Respiratory risks 180 air toxics. In addition, individual pollutant estimates of Ambient Concentration, Exposure Concentration, Cancer Risk, and Non-Cancer Risk (Neurological and Respiratory) are provided for: Acetaldehyde, Acrolein, Arsenic, Benzene, 1,3-Butadiene, Chromium, Diesel particulate matter (PM), Formaldehyde, Lead, Naphthalene, and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH). The original data were downloaded from USEPA's Office of Air and Radiation (OAR) (https://www.epa.gov/national-air-toxics-assessment/2011-nata-assessment-results). The data classification for this web service were developed for USEPA's Office of Research and Development's (ORD) C-FERST per guidance provided by OAR. The NATA is EPA's comprehensive evaluation of air toxics in the United States, based on modeled air quality. EPA developed the NATA as a tool for EPA and State/Local/Tribal Agencies to prioritize air toxics, emission sources, and locations of interest for further study in order to gain a better understanding of risks. NATA is a state-of-the-science screening tool that does not incorporate refined information about emission sources, but rather, uses general information about sources to develop estimates of risks using analytical methods. NATA assessments provide screening-level estimates of the risk of cancer and other serious health effects from breathing (inhaling) air toxics in order to inform both national and more localized efforts to identify and prioritize air toxics, emission source types, and locations that are of greatest potential concern in terms of contribution to population risk. This helps air pollution experts focus limited analytical resources on areas or populations where the potential for health risks are highest. NATA provides a snapshot of the outdoor air quality and the risks to human health that would result if air toxic emission levels remained unchanged. A more detailed explanation of NATA and the methods used may be found in the Technical Support Document (https://www.epa.gov/national-air-toxics-assessment/2011-nata-technical-support-document). See the NATA Homepage (https://www.epa.gov/national-air-toxics-assessment) for additional information, including an overview (https://www.epa.gov/national-air-toxics-assessment/nata-overview), limitations (https://www.epa.gov/national-air-toxics-assessment/nata-limitations), frequent questions (https://www.epa.gov/national-air-toxics-assessment/nata-frequent-questions), and glossary (https://www.epa.gov/national-air-toxics-assessment/nata-glossary-terms). Access constraints: None. Use constraints: None. Please check sources, scale, accuracy, currentness and other available information. Please confirm that you are using the most recent copy of both data and metadata. Acknowledgement of the EPA would be appreciated.

Map Name: Air Pollutants for C-FERST

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All Layers and Tables

Layers: Description: Full Metadata This web service displays all air-related layers used in the USEPA Community-Focused Exposure and Risk Screening Tool (C-FERST) and the Tribal-Focused Environmental Risk and Sustainability Tool (Tribal-FERST) mapping applications. (https://www.epa.gov/c-ferst and https://www.epa.gov/tribal-ferst). The following data sources (and layers) are contained in this service: USEPA's 2011 National-Scale Air Toxic Assessment (NATA) data. Data are shown at the census tract level (2010 census tract boundaries, US Census Bureau) for Cumulative Cancer and Non-Cancer Respiratory risks 180 air toxics. In addition, individual pollutant estimates of Ambient Concentration, Exposure Concentration, Cancer Risk, and Non-Cancer Risk (Neurological and Respiratory) are provided for: Acetaldehyde, Acrolein, Arsenic, Benzene, 1,3-Butadiene, Chromium, Diesel particulate matter (PM), Formaldehyde, Lead, Naphthalene, and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH). The original data were downloaded from USEPA's Office of Air and Radiation (OAR) (https://www.epa.gov/national-air-toxics-assessment/2011-nata-assessment-results). The data classification for this web service were developed for USEPA's Office of Research and Development's (ORD) C-FERST per guidance provided by OAR. The NATA is EPA's comprehensive evaluation of air toxics in the United States, based on modeled air quality. EPA developed the NATA as a tool for EPA and State/Local/Tribal Agencies to prioritize air toxics, emission sources, and locations of interest for further study in order to gain a better understanding of risks. NATA is a state-of-the-science screening tool that does not incorporate refined information about emission sources, but rather, uses general information about sources to develop estimates of risks using analytical methods. NATA assessments provide screening-level estimates of the risk of cancer and other serious health effects from breathing (inhaling) air toxics in order to inform both national and more localized efforts to identify and prioritize air toxics, emission source types, and locations that are of greatest potential concern in terms of contribution to population risk. This helps air pollution experts focus limited analytical resources on areas or populations where the potential for health risks are highest. NATA provides a snapshot of the outdoor air quality and the risks to human health that would result if air toxic emission levels remained unchanged. A more detailed explanation of NATA and the methods used may be found in the Technical Support Document (https://www.epa.gov/national-air-toxics-assessment/2011-nata-technical-support-document). See the NATA Homepage (https://www.epa.gov/national-air-toxics-assessment) for additional information, including an overview (https://www.epa.gov/national-air-toxics-assessment/nata-overview), limitations (https://www.epa.gov/national-air-toxics-assessment/nata-limitations), frequent questions (https://www.epa.gov/national-air-toxics-assessment/nata-frequent-questions), and glossary (https://www.epa.gov/national-air-toxics-assessment/nata-glossary-terms). Access constraints: None. Use constraints: None. Please check sources, scale, accuracy, currentness and other available information. Please confirm that you are using the most recent copy of both data and metadata. Acknowledgement of the EPA would be appreciated.

Copyright Text: Map Service: USEPA Office of Research and Development (ORD). Data: USEPA Office of Air and Radiation (OAR)

Spatial Reference: 102100  (3857)


Single Fused Map Cache: false

Initial Extent: Full Extent: Units: esriMeters

Supported Image Format Types: PNG32,PNG24,PNG,JPG,DIB,TIFF,EMF,PS,PDF,GIF,SVG,SVGZ,BMP

Document Info: Supports Dynamic Layers: false

MaxRecordCount: 1000

MaxImageHeight: 4096

MaxImageWidth: 4096

Supported Query Formats: JSON, AMF, geoJSON

Min Scale: 4622324.434309

Max Scale: 0

Supports Datum Transformation: true



Child Resources:   Info

Supported Operations:   Export Map   Identify   QueryDomains   Find   Return Updates